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1 The Collision Of Cultures
2 Britain And Its Colonies
3 Colonial Ways Of Life
4 The Imperial Perspective
5 From Empire To Independence
6 The American Revolution
7 Shaping A Federal Union
8 The Federalist Era
9 The Early Republic
10 Nationalism And Sectionalism
11 The Jacksonian Impulse
12 The Dynamics Of Growth
13 An American Renaissance: Religion, Romanticism, And Reform
14 Manifest Destiny
15 The Old South
16 The Crisis Of Union
17 The War Of The Union
18 Reconstruction: North And South
19 New Frontiers: South And West
20 Big Business And Organized Labor
21 The Emergence Of Urban America
22 Gilded-age Politics And Agrarian Revolt
23 An American Empire
24 The Progressive Era
25 America And The Great War
26 The Modern Temper
27 Republican Resurgence And Decline
28 New Deal America
29 From Isolation To Global War
30 The Second World War
31 The Fair Deal And Containment
32 Through The Picture Window: Society And Culture, 1945–1960
33 Conflict And Deadlock: The Eisenhower Years
34 New Frontiers: Politics And Social Change In The 1960s
35 Rebellion And Reaction In The 1960s And 1970s
36 A Conservative Insurgency
37 Triumph And Tragedy: America At The Turn Of The Century

  1. Nature of Gilded Age politics
    1. Paradoxical characteristics
      1. Stalemate but high participation
      2. “Real” and crucial issues
    2. Partisan politics
      1. Reasons for loyalty
        1. Patronage
        2. Entertainment
        3. Religious and ethnic bases
      2. Republican party
      3. Democratic party
      4. Religious and social issues
    3. National stalemate
      1. Even division between parties
      2. Deferential presidents
      3. Divided Congress
    4. State and local politics
  2. Politics, corruption, and reform
    1. Attitudes toward corruption
      1. Votes for favors acceptable
      2. “Spoils” of office expected
    2. Hayes and civil service reform
      1. Hayes’s background
      2. Divisions among Republicans
      3. Support for reform
      4. Hayes’s limited view
    3. James Garfield and Chester Arthur
      1. Election of 1880
        1. Nominees
        2. Results
      2. Garfield’s assassination
      3. Arthur as president
        1. Support for civil service
        2. Support for tariff reform
    4. Election of 1884
      1. Republican James G. Blaine
        1. Background
        2. Allegations of corruption
        3. Mugwumps
      2. Democrat Grover Cleveland
        1. Background
        2. Illegitimate child
        3. “Rum, Romanism, and rebellion”
      3. Results
    5. Cleveland’s presidency
      1. Cleveland’s idea of government
      2. Stances on issues
        1. Civil service reform
        2. Union veterans’ pensions
        3. Railroad regulation
          1. Wabash case
          2. Interstate Commerce Act
        4. Tariff reform
          1. Importance of tariff
          2. Partisan differences
    6. Election of 1888
      1. Nominations
      2. Focus on the tariff
      3. Personal attacks
      4. Republican victory
    7. Harrison administration
      1. Veterans’ benefits
      2. Republican Congress
        1. Sherman Antitrust Act
        2. Sherman Silver Purchase Act
        3. McKinley Tariff
      3. 1890 Democratic election victory
  3. Farmers: their problems and protests
    1. Farmers’ frustrations
      1. Congressional inaction
      2. Obstacles to collective action
        1. Individualism
        2. Isolation
        3. Pride
        4. Diversity
    2. Worsening conditions
      1. Declining commodity prices
      2. Railroads as villains
      3. Disadvantageous tariff
      4. Burdensome debt
    3. Granger movement
      1. Origins
      2. Political activity
    4. Farmers’ Alliances
      1. Background
      2. Membership
      3. Appeal of Alliances
      4. Alliance programs
      5. Political activity
        1. Exchange or cooperatives
        2. Subtreasury
        3. Third party
    5. Populist party in 1892 election
      1. Platform
      2. Nominees
      3. Results
  4. The economy, silver, and politics
    1. The currency and money supply
      1. Deflation
      2. Metallic currency
      3. “Crime of 1873”
    2. Depression of 1893
      1. Wall Street panic
      2. Unemployment and strikes
      3. Bank failures
      4. “Coxey’s Army”
      5. Republican victory in 1894
    3. Currency issue
      1. Repeal of Sherman Silver Purchase Act
      2. Demands for silver coinage
    4. Election of 1896
      1. McKinley and gold
      2. Bryan and silver
      3. Role of Populists
      4. Results
      5. A new era

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