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1 The Collision Of Cultures
2 Britain And Its Colonies
3 Colonial Ways Of Life
4 The Imperial Perspective
5 From Empire To Independence
6 The American Revolution
7 Shaping A Federal Union
8 The Federalist Era
9 The Early Republic
10 Nationalism And Sectionalism
11 The Jacksonian Impulse
12 The Dynamics Of Growth
13 An American Renaissance: Religion, Romanticism, And Reform
14 Manifest Destiny
15 The Old South
16 The Crisis Of Union
17 The War Of The Union
18 Reconstruction: North And South
19 New Frontiers: South And West
20 Big Business And Organized Labor
21 The Emergence Of Urban America
22 Gilded-age Politics And Agrarian Revolt
23 An American Empire
24 The Progressive Era
25 America And The Great War
26 The Modern Temper
27 Republican Resurgence And Decline
28 New Deal America
29 From Isolation To Global War
30 The Second World War
31 The Fair Deal And Containment
32 Through The Picture Window: Society And Culture, 1945–1960
33 Conflict And Deadlock: The Eisenhower Years
34 New Frontiers: Politics And Social Change In The 1960s
35 Rebellion And Reaction In The 1960s And 1970s
36 A Conservative Insurgency
37 Triumph And Tragedy: America At The Turn Of The Century

  1. The start of war
    1. Lincoln
      1. Trip to Washington
      2. “Union is perpetual”
    2. The South
      1. Secession
      2. Firing on Fort Sumter
      3. Union blockade
      4. Secession of upper South
      5. Border state choices
      6. Southern unionists
    3. Advantages of each side
      1. The North
        1. Population
        2. Industry
        3. Transportation
      2. The South
        1. Geography
        2. Defensive war
        3. Strong military tradition
    4. First Battle of Bull Run
      1. Caused by naive optimism
      2. Northern retreat
  2. Early course of the war
    1. Strategies
      1. Union’s three-pronged plan
        1. Defend Washington and pressure Richmond
        2. Blockade South
        3. Divide Confederacy
      2. Confederate strategy
        1. Force stalemate
        2. Foreign support
        3. Negotiated settlement
    2. Naval action
      1. Ironclads
      2. Union successes in South
    3. Raising armies
      1. Enlistments
      2. Conscription
      3. Opposition to draft
    4. Confederate diplomacy
      1. Attempts at recognition
      2. Success in obtaining supplies
    5. Activity in West
      1. Continued settlement
      2. Fighting in Kansas
      3. Indian involvement
      4. U. S. Grant
        1. Unconditional surrender in Tennessee
        2. Costly loss at Shiloh
    6. McClellan’s campaign in East
      1. McClellan’s character
      2. Lincoln’s demands
      3. Advance on Richmond
      4. Lee given command in the South
      5. Lee’s attack on McClellan
      6. Halleck replaces McClellan
    7. Second Bull Run
      1. Confederate trap
      2. Union defeat
    8. Battle of Antietam
      1. McClellan’s hesitancy
      2. Failure of Lee’s invasion
      3. Turning point in war
    9. Fredericksburg
      1. Union attack
      2. Burnside withdraws
  3. Emancipation and blacks
    1. War’s effects on emancipation
    2. Lincoln’s considerations
    3. The proclamation
    4. Reactions to emancipation
    5. Blacks in the military
    6. Thirteenth Amendment
  4. Women and the Civil War
    1. Nurses and Clara Barton
    2. New responsibilities
    3. Widows and spinsters
  5. Wartime government
    1. Power in Union shifts to North
      1. Protective tariff
      2. Transcontinental railroad
      3. Homestead Act
      4. Other legislation
    2. Financing the war
      1. Union’s revenues
        1. Greenbacks
        2. Bonds
        3. Capital accumulation
      2. Confederate problems
    3. Wartime politics
      1. Union
        1. Pressure of the Radicals
        2. Divided Democrats
        3. Suspension of habeas corpus
        4. Elections of 1862 and 1864
      2. Confederate
        1. Discontent in South
        2. Problems of states’ rights
    4. War and the environment
      1. Animal deaths
      2. Bridges and levees destroyed
  6. The faltering Confederacy in 1863
    1. Hooker leads the Union
    2. Chancellorsville
      1. Peak of Lee’s career
      2. Loss of Stonewall Jackson
    3. Union wins at Vicksburg and Gettysburg
      1. Grant’s siege of Vicksburg
      2. Gettysburg
        1. Lee’s invasion
        2. Pickett’s charge
        3. Confederate defeat
        4. Cemetery
      3. Confederate surrender of Vicksburg
    4. Chattanooga
      1. Confederate advantage
      2. Federal victory
  7. Defeat of the Confederacy
    1. Situation at end of 1863
      1. Confederate morale
      2. Grant’s plan to attack
    2. War of extermination
      1. Grant pursues Lee in Virginia
      2. Sherman marches across Georgia
    3. Confederates consider surrender
    4. Lincoln’s second inaugural
      1. Focus on war
      2. Judgment of God
      3. Reconciliation
    5. Surrender at Appomattox
  8. The aftermath of the war

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