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Abraham Lincoln Emancipation Statue

Abraham Lincoln Emancipation Statue

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The similarities between Boston's Emancipation Statue focusing on Abraham Lincoln freeing a slave and Tuskegee Institute's celebration of Booker T. Washington "Lifting the Veil of Ignorance" are striking.

Anna Julia Cooper

Anna Julia Cooper

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Booker T. Washington

Booker T. Washington

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Booker T. Washington Statue

Booker T. Washington Statue

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The similarities between Boston's Emancipation Statue focusing on Abraham Lincoln freeing a slave and Tuskegee Institute's celebration of Booker T. Washington "Lifting the Veil of Ignorance" are striking.

Charles Chesnutt and his brother

Charles Chesnutt and his brother

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Charles Chesnutt and his brother

Charles Chesnutt, age 16

Charles Chesnutt, age 16

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Charles Chesnutt at age sixteen.

Charles Chesnutt, age 25

Charles Chesnutt, age 25

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Charles Chesnutt at age twenty-five.

Collage of images by C.F.F. Hillen

Collage of images by C.F.F. Hillen

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Collage of images by C.F.F. Hillen published in Frank Leslie᾿s Illustrated Newspaper of African American Troops during Civil War

Crisis Office

Crisis Office

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Photograph of the office of NAACP'S The Crisis magazine, ca. 1910s. W.E.B. DuBois is on the right side of the picture.

Dredd Scott

Dredd Scott

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Illustrated portrait of Dred Scott from 1887.

Early Niagara Movement Men

Early Niagara Movement Men

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Niagra movement meeting, Fort Erie Canada, 1905.

Early Niagara Movement Women

Early Niagara Movement Women

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Founders of the Niagara Movement

Founders of the Niagara Movement

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1905 Photograph of the Founders of the Niagara Movement: Top row (left to right): H. A. Thompson, Alonzo F. Herndon, John Hope, James R. L. Diggs (?). Second row (left to right): Frederick McGhee, Norris B. Herndon (boy), J. Max Barber, W. E. B. Du Bois, Robert Bonner. Bottom row (left to right): Henry L. Bailey, Clement G. Morgan, W. H. H. Hart, B. S. Smith.

Harriet Jacobs' School

Harriet Jacobs' School

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Harriet Jacobs and her daughter taught at this school for formerly enslaved in Alexandria, VA.

Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells

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James Weldon Johnson

James Weldon Johnson

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James Weldon Johnson᾿s School

James Weldon Johnson's School

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James Weldon Johnson, Principal of Stanton Institute, wrote "Lift Every Voice and Sing" for students to commemorate Lincoln᾿s birthday celebration.

Learning is wealth

Learning is wealth

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This 1864 Carte de Visite sold to raise funds for educating formerly enslaved also served to illustrate miscegenation and to promote literacy.

Map of Nicholas Said᾿s journeys

Map of Nicholas Said's journeys

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Enslaved Africans such as Nicholas Said came to the United States by various routes.

Paul Laurence Dunbar's Class

Paul Laurence Dunbar

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Paul Laurence Dunbar class photo in Dayton, Ohio.

Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar

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Prison chain gang

Prison chain gang

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Photograph of a prison chain gang in Georgia, 1884.

Reading the Emancipation Proclamation

Reading the Emancipation Proclamation

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Reading the Emancipation Proclamation, Henry Louis Stephens, 1863.

The Howard School

The Howard School

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Charles W. Chesnutt went from pupil to principal of The Howard School (now Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, NC.

The Thankful Poor, Henry O. Tanner

The Thankful Poor, Henry O. Tanner

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Like Edmonia Lewis and other earlier African American Artists, Henry O. Tanner adapts a prevailing artistic style to new narrative use. Tanner's oil on canvas portrait depicts an intimate relationship between a youngster and an elder that refutes stereotypical images via subtle revisions. Many critics interpret this as a companion piece to The Banjo Lesson, pointing out similarities in setting and dress; however, the man's face is shadowed and the youth is androgynous enough to be male or female. The story it tells is one of intergenerational sharing of talent, time, and cultural values.

"The Union as it was"

The Union as it was

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Cartoon by Thomas Nast depicting the Ku Klux Klan and the White League᾿s terrorism, 1874.

Tuskegee Institute

Tuskegee Institute

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Photograph from a history class at the Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, Alabama, 1902.

Tuskegee Institute chapel

Tuskegee Institute chapel

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Interior view of chapel filled with female students at the Tuskegee institute

Two Paths: What Will the Girl Become?

Two Paths: What Will the Girl Become?

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In 1903, the message that reading determines girls' morality was the same for assumed white readers of Social Purity and for targeted black readers of Golden Thoughts on Chastity and Procreation.

Two Paths: What Will the Girl Become?

Two Paths: What Will the Girl Become?

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In 1903, the message that reading determines girls' morality was the same for assumed white readers of Social Purity and for targeted black readers of Golden Thoughts on Chastity and Procreation.

Uncle Tom᾿s Cabin

Uncle Tom's Cabin

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Uncle Tom᾿s Cabin stage production bill from 1898.

W.E.B. Du Bois

W.E.B. Du Bois

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